W3 Reflection Post

  • (1)          Using both principles of stratigraphy, it would seem that the most detailed archaeological sequence that can be seen is in the pottery.  Starting with the undecorated pottery seen in Stratum S and continuing through Stratum A where red-painted pottery is present.
  • (2/3)      There seems to be evidence of mixing, filling and unconformities within the strata.  When the wall was built, the first evidence of filling is seen with the cement floor, noted as Stratum O.  The addition of the cement floors at Stratums M, K and I are also examples of filling.  To the right of the wall you can see evidence of mixing. You have pottery with punctate decorating coming all the way up from Stratum P, into “K” and in “I”.  I would wonder, as the right side is the implied exterior of the wall, if the wall was perhaps dug out to possibly reinforce the wall around the time the cement floor of Stratum I was laid in.  That could offer an idea for why there is so much mixing to the right of the wall and why that is all showing to be Stratum “I” directly adjacent to the right of the wall.  Furthermore, Stratum N is a bit of a mystery in my mind.  It almost seems like some filling may have occurred when the cement floors of Stratums M, K and I occurred because it would seem that Stratum N goes more with Stratums H and G. Stratums L and J seemingly go together with the only occurrence of green, red and blue painted pottery.  With my idea that perhaps Stratum N is a result of some mixing, I am then lead to believe there is evidence of unconformities which could have occurred between Stratum P and possibly as far as Stratum L.  It is speculation but I would like to see some photos to get an idea of what is happening with the artifacts (as opposed to just looking at a stratigraphic drawing with written descriptions of the artifacts).
  • (4)          It appears that the wall’s ground level was at Stratum P.  I would note it appears that Stratums U to P show relatively little disturbances in to the older strata.  The wall throws things off – as is seen in modern building sites as well.  We dig down for footings, and things get pretty well churned up.
  • (5)          It appears that the relative ages of the depositional units on the right of the wall seem newer compared to the left of the wall.  It seems there were some unconformities on the right of the wall.
  • (6)          Stratum G is essentially surrounding the top of the wall.  Stratums H, I, “I”, J, K, L, M, N, O are the strata that are bracketing the wall.
  • (7)          Stratum P has a flexed burial pit that was dug down in to Stratum Q.  Stratum B has an extended burial pit that was dug down into Stratum C.  Stratum A has a shaft tomb with a child burial in a vessel.

6 thoughts on “W3 Reflection Post

  1. I think your answer for question one is an interesting view to take. I did not consider using the artifacts to form the sequence but it makes sense. I like your observation on the cement floors being examples of filling, that had not occurred to me. I thought the question about the wall was a little difficult. I thought it was built at either P or H and the inside was dug out. I disagree with your answer to question five though, it seemed to me that the layers to the left of the wall were newer than those to the right. I like that you included the shaft burial in stratum A, I saw a few people who did not include it.

  2. For the first question you took a different approach than I did, I did not occur to me to look specifically at the pottery. Using the pottery as the identifying feature that defines the detail of the stratum, I agree with your answer. When I read the second question I looked at the details of each layer to try and see if artifacts were being mixed between layers. It makes sense to me reading your answer that the cement floor would be evidence of mixing. I did not make the connection that you did when looking at the shaft. To me it looked as though it was a garbage hole, but I can definitely see that it could be a tomb dug for a child’s burial.

  3. For the first question you took a different approach than I did, I did not occur to me to look specifically at the pottery. Using the pottery as the identifying feature that defines the detail of the stratum, I agree with your answer. When I read the second question I looked at the details of each layer to try and see if artifacts were being mixed between layers. It makes sense to me reading your answer that the cement floor would be evidence of mixing. I did not make the connection that you did when looking at the shaft. To me it looked as though it was a garbage hole, but I can definitely see that it could be a tomb dug for a child’s burial.

  4. For the first question you took a different approach than I did, I did not occur to me to look specifically at the pottery. Using the pottery as the identifying feature that defines the detail of the stratum, I agree with your answer. When I read the second question I looked at the details of each layer to try and see if artifacts were being mixed between layers. It makes sense to me reading your answer that the cement floor would be evidence of mixing. I did not make the connection that you did when looking at the shaft. To me it looked as though it was a garbage hole, but I can definitely see that it could be a tomb dug for a child’s burial.

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