Healthy/Sick

     The culture of biomedicine is the culture we have created in our society through a progression of biomedicine over the years. The United States has a very interesting culture of biomedicine created by industrialization, wealth, capitalism, and other factors. By putting our faith into and linking our lives to biomedicine we have created a major cornerstone of our culture where an entire culture of hospitals, pharmacies, schools, and doctors can command total control of our way of living. The lectures this week demonstrated this with the way advances in science which should have shown us how far biomedicine still had to progress actually reinforced this culture by using mass media to show only the positive improvements of biomedicine. I think this happens because biomedicine is a well-oiled money making machine that constantly supports and fund’s itself. The birth control ads are another great example of this. The commercials are engrained with references to the logic, the wealth, and the prestige biomedicine allows you to achieve, which not only reinforces the “culture of biomedicine” but also creates revenue.

     I chose the healthy/sick dichotomy because I find that true health and sickness often fall into an interesting gray area. Are we ever truly healthy?, we may feel healthy and perceive ourselves to be such but many things lurk under the surface unknown and unresolved. I guess I would consider healthy to be the opposite of disease or illness and sick to be the opposite of that. I think my view come from my personal experience of at one time having a hernia and feeling healthy but in reality being in danger for several months, as well as the fact that I have seen throughout my college experience that diseases such as cancer/heart disease/etc, can lurk for a long time undetected. I think this dichotomy is accepted because people are much more comfortable feeling like they are in control and actions taken can lead to a state of complete well-being hence the Healthy/Sick dichotomy.

This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. Francesca says:

    Chase,

    I found the dichotomy of Healthy/Sick in your article to be very interesting. I find that if clinicians do not understand this dichotomy then it could be very detrimental to society and our culture. Clinicians need to not only understand how to treat people that are sick but to also understand symptoms of someone that is not healthy and someone that is. For example, if a physician believed that the patient had cancer and treated him or her with chemo, when in fact the patient was healthy, the chemo could cause many unneeded negative symptoms. Without this dichotomy, practicing medicine effectively would be very difficult if not impossible. When you first speak to a doctor they automatically ask you weather you are feeling sick or healthy and proceed to ask questions depending on what you answer. Doctors need to understand how to categorize each symptom. Doctors are constantly trying to determine whether the symptoms are abnormal or normal. Another way to conceptualize this dichotomy is to not see it as either sick or healthy but more specific. The term “sick” is very broad and needs to be more specific. No ones body is completely “perfect” or “healthy.”

    Francesca Bignasci

  2. Francesca says:

    Chase,

    I found the dichotomy of Healthy/Sick in your article to be very interesting. I find that if clinicians do not understand this dichotomy then it could be very detrimental to society and our culture. Clinicians need to not only understand how to treat people that are sick but to also understand symptoms of someone that is not healthy and someone that is. For example, if a physician believed that the patient had cancer and treated him or her with chemo, when in fact the patient was healthy, the chemo could cause many unneeded negative symptoms. Without this dichotomy, practicing medicine effectively would be very difficult if not impossible. When you first speak to a doctor they automatically ask you weather you are feeling sick or healthy and proceed to ask questions depending on what you answer. Doctors need to understand how to categorize each symptom. Doctors are constantly trying to determine whether the symptoms are abnormal or normal. Another way to conceptualize this dichotomy is to not see it as either sick or healthy but more specific. The term “sick” is very broad and needs to be more specific. No ones body is completely “perfect” or “healthy.”

    Francesca Bignasci

  3. Francesca says:

    Chase,

    I found the dichotomy of Healthy/Sick in your article to be very interesting. I find that if clinicians do not understand this dichotomy then it could be very detrimental to society and our culture. Clinicians need to not only understand how to treat people that are sick but to also understand symptoms of someone that is not healthy and someone that is. For example, if a physician believed that the patient had cancer and treated him or her with chemo, when in fact the patient was healthy, the chemo could cause many unneeded negative symptoms. Without this dichotomy, practicing medicine effectively would be very difficult if not impossible. When you first speak to a doctor they automatically ask you weather you are feeling sick or healthy and proceed to ask questions depending on what you answer. Doctors need to understand how to categorize each symptom. Doctors are constantly trying to determine whether the symptoms are abnormal or normal. Another way to conceptualize this dichotomy is to not see it as either sick or healthy but more specific. The term “sick” is very broad and needs to be more specific. No ones body is completely “perfect” or “healthy.”

    Francesca Bignasci

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