Infertility

To me, health is when a person’s physical or mental state lacks any type of illness. Illness, on the other hand, is when a person’s physical or mental state contains any kind of sickness. The criteria I used are basically whether or not one is sick. This comes from your surroundings, which includes a multitude of things. Your parents play a major role in shaping your life from before you are born. Your friends and classmates play a part in how you develop on a social scale.

Fertility is a condition I had a hard time deciding on whether or not it can be termed an illness. It is a condition that has a negative effect on your life. A part of your body cannot function the way it was meant to, but does that mean it is a sickness? Following my own definition of illness, I finally came to the conclusion that infertility is not technically an illness, but rather a condition of the body that results in not being able to have children.

In contrast, I found menstruation much easier to analyze. Menstruation can produce symptoms that are also caused by illnesses, such as headaches, moodiness, backaches, cramps, and even vomiting. In my opinion, however, menstruation itself is not an illness. It is a role in the female reproductive system. It has an actual purpose in the reproductive system; therefore it is not an illness.

Anxiety was another condition on the list that I found difficult to categorize. I thought about what anxiety is and what causes it. It is a condition of the brain in which there are low levels of serotonin, resulting in a person to be overly anxious about seemingly meaningless things. Therefore, I decided anxiety is in fact an illness, because the body is not producing enough of a specific neurotransmitter and the effects it has on a person’s life can be devastating.

This Post Has 7 Comments

  1. Vu Ho says:

    I do agree with your comment that infertility is not an illness. Most of the time infertility is a negative condition that the body normally function. In my opinion infertility is more fitting as a disease because the result is affected on the person from being pregnant therefore both male and female can be the source of infertility. Infertility is an end result that are cause by disease, illness, or a person lifestyle. So infertility is not an illness, but infertility can be cause by illness or result to illness. An example is that eating disorder can cause infertility and result to stress.
    For menstruation are neither a disease nor an illness. It is rather a natural phenomenon in the body that the endometrial later of the uterus are sloughed off. But menstruation can cause an illness such as the person who experience pain from menstruation itself. And illness can effect menstruation.
    For anxiety, it is an illness. Anxiety is something that a person is feeling or experiencing that are not something physical.
    From the result from the site I searched. Disease “are abnormal condition that affect an organism.” For illness, the “feeling”’ that might have come with having a disease.

    Source:
    Ingram, Tony. “Disease vs. Illness.” Bboy Science. N.p., 28 Apr. 2012. Web. 5 July 2014. Path: http://www.bboyscience.com/disease-vs-illness/.

  2. Delisa Quayson says:

    I had a similar definition for health, i agree with the physical and mental components required for one to be called healthy. I agree with the fact that you did not assign infertility to the illness category. I honestly would have put it in the disease category because it is not just something a person feels or can turn of without medication, it manifests in the individuals inability to reproduce offspring. This in my opinion should qualify as a disease but then again it is not necessarily an ailment and though sometimes some help may be offered to increase chances of procreation, in some cases it is virtually irreversible.
    Menstruation is also a sticky one. I would agree with your decision to place it in neither category. It is a natural process and should not be seen as an illness or disease. The uncomfortable cramps or pain might be construed as illness like you said but menstruation itself in my opinion falls under neither.
    I also agree with your categorization of anxiety. It was one of the clear-cut decisions I made while watching the video because I don’t believe that anxiety is anything more than a strong emotion, and thus not a disease.

  3. Melinda Zielinski says:

    Infertility is one of those grey area problems to me. It can be biological or self-inflicted (via sexually transmitted diseases or genital mutilation). This is why I agree with you when classifying infertility as not being an illness. Infertility is a huge problem in Africa with the high rise of sexually transmitted infections and HIV epidemic. In Africa infertility is sadly always viewed as the woman’s fault even though the men are just as equally infertile. In Africa, it is seen as taboo to debate a man’s infertility. In Zimbabwe for example, covering up for men who have infertile issues is done by having a close relative (typically brother) impregnate his wife. Having children is important in African culture. In fact it is so important that some men will be granted two wives if the first is infertile and obviously cannot provide children. Sometimes the infertile wife will buy the second wife for the husband so his legacy can go on by having children with the other women. Sadly because African people are not highly educated in sexual transmitted infections department this is the main cause of infertility in Sub Saharan Africa. STIs such as Gonorrhea and Chlamydia are the main two that cause infertility as they can severely damage the fallopian tubes of women if left untreated. As for men, inadequate semen is also another cause of infertility and a biological factor. A little education on how to prevent STIs, medical treatments, and possible hormonal therapy for those effected by low hormones would go a long way at stopping the infertility problem in Africa.

    Amakwe, Bosco Ebere. “The Problem of Ifertility in Africa”. The Human Life Review. http://www.humanlifereview.com/the-problem-of-infertility-in-africa/ (accessed July 5th, 2014).

  4. Alexis Rife says:

    Infertility affects people worldwide, but fertility throughout Europe is currently much lower than the rate necessary for a stable population. This as much for socio-economic reasons as for medical reasons. Women are going farther in their careers and putting their careers first; they like to have stability before starting a family. Also, fertility decreases with age, so fewer children are being born to mothers at a later age. The prevalence of infertility in Europe is stable at about 10% to 12% and overall fertility is below 1.5 children. Currently the main causes of infertility are complications due to STDs and repeat abortions.

    Infertility healthcare is readily available to almost everyone, including medical investigations and diagnoses of a couple’s infertility. Infertility treatments have also greatly increased over recent years, especially for in vitro conception. One in six couples in Europe is affected by unwanted childlessness. It is pitiable, but not hopeless. Many couples solve this problem with in vitro conception or couples with low fertility may take a fertility medication. An individual’s lifestyle, like smoking or excessive drinking, may also decrease his/her fertility. It is believed that infertility is a disability and that infertility research is a highly profitable investment for society and the individual.

    Botev, Nikolai. “Is Europe Trapped In/By Low Fertility?.” Entre Nous, 2006, 4-7. Accessed July 6, 2014. http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/73954/EN63.pdf.

    Nygren, Karl G. “Current Trends of Fertility – And Infertility-in Europe.” Entre Nous, 2006, 10-11. Accessed July 6, 2014. http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/73954/EN63.pdf.

    Kohler, Hans-Peter. “The Determinants of Low Fertility in Europe.” Entre Nous, 2006, 12-13. Accessed July 6, 2014. http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/73954/EN63.pdf.

  5. Matt Meranda says:

    I chose not to write my Activity Response regarding infertility, though it is certainly is a difficult condition to define under the illness-or-disease parameter. I know that the Catholic Church holds particularly strong opinions on matters of sexuality and child-bearing, so rather than a different culture as defined by geographical distance from the United States, I chose to analyze the condition of infertility from the perspective of a specific religious culture. In the conservative Catholic ideology, augmenting the child-bearing process is seen as unholy. This is the same logic that drives political pro-life sentiment of this religious culture. Interestingly, in the schema of the Catholic Church, infertility has just as much to do with the child possibly being conceived as it does with his or her attempting (future) parents. Again the right to life argument is employed in this mindset, as children, even those yet to be born, are seen as autonomous individuals that have rights to themselves; among these is the right to be born naturally and via God’s will.

    “Infertility Hurts.” : Being Catholic and dealing with infertility. http://infertilityhurts.blogspot.com/2007/07/being-catholic-and-dealing-with.html (accessed July 6, 2014).

  6. Matt Meranda says:

    I chose not to write my Activity Response regarding infertility, though it is certainly is a difficult condition to define under the illness-or-disease parameter. I know that the Catholic Church holds particularly strong opinions on matters of sexuality and child-bearing, so rather than a different culture as defined by geographical distance from the United States, I chose to analyze the condition of infertility from the perspective of a specific religious culture. In the conservative Catholic ideology, augmenting the child-bearing process is seen as unholy. This is the same logic that drives political pro-life sentiment of this religious culture. Interestingly, in the schema of the Catholic Church, infertility has just as much to do with the child possibly being conceived as it does with his or her attempting (future) parents. Again the right to life argument is employed in this mindset, as children, even those yet to be born, are seen as autonomous individuals that have rights to themselves; among these is the right to be born naturally and via God’s will.

    “Infertility Hurts.” : Being Catholic and dealing with infertility. http://infertilityhurts.blogspot.com/2007/07/being-catholic-and-dealing-with.html (accessed July 6, 2014).

  7. Matt Meranda says:

    I chose not to write my Activity Response regarding infertility, though it is certainly is a difficult condition to define under the illness-or-disease parameter. I know that the Catholic Church holds particularly strong opinions on matters of sexuality and child-bearing, so rather than a different culture as defined by geographical distance from the United States, I chose to analyze the condition of infertility from the perspective of a specific religious culture. In the conservative Catholic ideology, augmenting the child-bearing process is seen as unholy. This is the same logic that drives political pro-life sentiment of this religious culture. Interestingly, in the schema of the Catholic Church, infertility has just as much to do with the child possibly being conceived as it does with his or her attempting (future) parents. Again the right to life argument is employed in this mindset, as children, even those yet to be born, are seen as autonomous individuals that have rights to themselves; among these is the right to be born naturally and via God’s will.
    “Infertility Hurts.” : Being Catholic and dealing with infertility. http://infertilityhurts.blogspot.com/2007/07/being-catholic-and-dealing-with.html (accessed July 6, 2014).

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