Heart Disease in Western Societies

In this article, a “’type A’” individual is depicted as the common person to develop coronary heart disease. This individual is typically a middle aged, middle class man that adheres to the social norms in industrialized societies. Theses social norms are considered “bad” for the body, and in turn, help cause coronary hear disease. Social norms in our Western society contribute to the development of heart disease. Certain aspects of our society that can directly contribute to the disease include eating, exercising, and lifestyle habits. Biological dimensions of coronary heart disease include genetics, as heart disease can be hereditary. Individual aspects of the illness contribute to the physical appearance of a person. Being overweight, or having poor personal health can lead to having coronary heart disease. Cultural dimensions of coronary heart disease can include food and exercise choices, to the stress a person encounters. Western society places emphasis on fast food restaurants, and eating more food for less money. The aspect of fast food and the food choices available to a person can contribute to the development of the disease. In our Western society it is most commonly found to treat coronary heart disease with medicine and/or surgery. There is an emphasis on eating healthy and treating your body right in our culture, though easily available resources such as bad food and harmful objects such as cigarettes conflict with this emphasis. Culture has to do with a persons beliefs, and way of life. In this article, coronary heart disease is directly related to the lifestyles of the people living in our Western society. Based on the definition of culture, I would definitely say that coronary heart disease is a culturally bound syndrome. This is not to say that coronary heart disease isn’t found in other places, but our culture greatly contributes to the developmental rate of coronary heart disease.

“Heart disease and the cultural construction of time: The type A behaviour pattern as a western culture-bound syndrome.” Heart disease and the cultural construction of time: The type A behaviour pattern as a western culture-bound syndrome. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0277953687900013 (accessed July 19, 2014).

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