Life/Death

After reviewing the lectures, my understanding of the “culture of biomedicine” in our society is the way that medicine is used culturally. Biomedicine is shaped by the various needs of each culture and it depends on how society uses medicine.  The three things mentioned in the lecture dealing with biomedicine was the history, the language, and the rituals of biomedicine. These three factors forces us to look at biomedicine in different ways so we can fully understand it. The history of biomedicine is important because as medicine keeps advancing we must know where some medical practices and ideas originated from.  The language of biomedicine depends on what society creates. I say this because society give medicine its own terminology and literal meanings. As biomedicine continues to evolve, we must view what makes up every part of it in every culture.

The dichotomy that I am choosing to look at is life and death. I believe dichotomies are used because is the simplest system and can clear up things that may seem complicated. I find this dichotomy to be interesting because there is a lot of controversy between what life and death really means. I believe that you are alive and living is you are responsive and aware of the things that are going on around you. If one can understand the mental, emotional, and physical components of life, they are living. Some of these ideas, however, have grey areas because it is difficult to only view life or death under the conditions of a person’s health. Some people aren’t considered “living” if they are not functioning in society. For example, those that are in prison are not free to live their life the way they want to, therefore, not functioning in society and not living. Another argument that is relevant with the controversial topic of life/ death is abortion. The United States weighs heavily on this topic as it is viewed the same amongst all people what they consider living or not.

 

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