Ebola Outbreak in Africa

For this week’s post i chose to talk about the Ebola Virus because this is something that is currently affect people around the world, mainly in Africa.  There has been an Ebola outbreak before but this current outbreak is more serious due to the death rate and how fast it’s spreading. Ebola would be considered a glob health problem because it is affecting people from all around the world and is very detrimental. A little background information on this virus is that it is an infectious and generally fatal disease marked by fever and severe internal bleeding, spread through contact with infected body fluids by a filoviru. Ebola’s death rate is up to 90 percent of people. Not only does it affect and kill humans, but is also found in primates, including monkeys, chimpanzees, and gorillas. The way that this virus is spread is through bodily fluids and mainly the infected person’s blood.  The symptoms of Ebola are the onset of a sudden high fever,intense weakness, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function and internal and external bleeding. Some of these symptoms are actually similar to flu-like symptoms. According to this shot clip I found online “North Texas Hospitals On Alert Over Ebola Outbreak”, while treating patients with Ebola, they were isolated from other people, and anyone who came in the hospital for any reason had to be screened to see if they had a touch of the virus.  Some people only had the flu but were still isolated due to similar symptoms. The origins are the people in parts of Africa who feast off of dead animals such as fruit bats that are contaminated. The social factors that facilitate this would be the fact that the virus is seen more in areas of a]Africa that are poorer and those are usually the people who feast off of raw or dead animals who are contaminated.  In this weeks article about Ebola, anthropologist, Barry Hewlett joined to take part in treating patients in Uganda that were ill with Ebola. Hewlett also talked about how bodies had to be cremated secretly to stop the spread to virus because if family members knew they had died they would try to keep them for ceremonies.

Sources

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/08/04/north-texas-hospitals-on-alert-over-ebola-outbreak/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/04/02/298369305/why-anthropologists-join-an-ebola-outbreak-team?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=share&utm_medium=twitter

This Post Has 5 Comments

  1. Sarah Newman says:

    Hello!

    Great post! The theory derived from the sourrounding African community regarding the “European” doctors trying to contain the Ebola outbreak was that of negativity. The members of the community did not see the doctors and care givers as healers, because almost everyone who went into their care died. By adding anthropologists, methods of telling the community about the disease, as well as, how it is spread helped de-stigmatize the theory that the white doctors were not bad people and were just trying to help their community out. By allowing friends and families to see the affected Ebola patient, by removing large tarps and secrecy of what was happening in isolation rooms, the community began to see the help they were receiving. Also, by having many of the caregivers attend funerals and rituals of the dead, they were seen as more caring and not as harsh as before. Anthropologist’s helped both the community, the patients, and the caregivers connect on a deeper level. They allowed each party to understand why stigmas and rituals needed to be preformed, from explaining to the community that the Ebola disease is spread by body fluid contact, so tarps and isolation to help not spread the disease was needed, as well as, having doctors understand that funerals were very important to the culture of the African community. This allowed disease to be controlled.

  2. Sarah Newman says:

    Hello!

    Great post! The theory derived from the surrounding African community regarding the “European” doctors trying to contain the Ebola outbreak was that of negativity. The members of the community did not see the doctors and care givers as healers, because almost everyone who went into their care died. By adding anthropologists, methods of telling the community about the disease, as well as, how it is spread helped de-stigmatize the theory that the white doctors were not bad people and were just trying to help their community out. By allowing friends and families to see the affected Ebola patient, by removing large tarps and secrecy of what was happening in isolation rooms, the community began to see the help they were receiving. Also, by having many of the caregivers attend funerals and rituals of the dead, they were seen as more caring and not as harsh as before. Anthropologist’s helped both the community, the patients, and the caregivers connect on a deeper level. They allowed each party to understand why stigmas and rituals needed to be preformed, from explaining to the community that the Ebola disease is spread by body fluid contact, so tarps and isolation to help not spread the disease was needed, as well as, having doctors understand that funerals were very important to the culture of the African community. This allowed disease to be controlled.

  3. Sarah Newman says:

    Hello!

    Great post! The theory derived from the surrounding African community regarding the “European” doctors trying to contain the Ebola outbreak was that of negativity. The members of the community did not see the doctors and care givers as healers, because almost everyone who went into their care died. By adding anthropologists, methods of telling the community about the disease, as well as, how it is spread helped de-stigmatize the theory that the white doctors were not bad people and were just trying to help their community out. By allowing friends and families to see the affected Ebola patient, by removing large tarps and secrecy of what was happening in isolation rooms, the community began to see the help they were receiving. Also, by having many of the caregivers attend funerals and rituals of the dead, they were seen as more caring and not as harsh as before. Anthropologist’s helped both the community, the patients, and the caregivers connect on a deeper level. They allowed each party to understand why stigmas and rituals needed to be preformed, from explaining to the community that the Ebola disease is spread by body fluid contact, so tarps and isolation to help not spread the disease was needed, as well as, having doctors understand that funerals were very important to the culture of the African community. This allowed disease to be controlled.

  4. Sarah Newman says:

    Hello!

    Great post! The theory derived from the surrounding African community regarding the “European” doctors trying to contain the Ebola outbreak was that of negativity. The members of the community did not see the doctors and care givers as healers, because almost everyone who went into their care died. By adding anthropologists, methods of telling the community about the disease, as well as, how it is spread helped de-stigmatize the theory that the white doctors were not bad people and were just trying to help their community out. By allowing friends and families to see the affected Ebola patient, by removing large tarps and secrecy of what was happening in isolation rooms, the community began to see the help they were receiving. Also, by having many of the caregivers attend funerals and rituals of the dead, they were seen as more caring and not as harsh as before. Anthropologist’s helped both the community, the patients, and the caregivers connect on a deeper level. They allowed each party to understand why stigmas and rituals needed to be preformed, from explaining to the community that the Ebola disease is spread by body fluid contact, so tarps and isolation to help not spread the disease was needed, as well as, having doctors understand that funerals were very important to the culture of the African community. This allowed disease to be controlled.

  5. Sarah Newman says:

    Hello!

    Great post! The theory derived from the surrounding African community regarding the “European” doctors trying to contain the Ebola outbreak was that of negativity. The members of the community did not see the doctors and care givers as healers, because almost everyone who went into their care died. By adding anthropologists, methods of telling the community about the disease, as well as, how it is spread helped de-stigmatize the theory that the white doctors were not bad people and were just trying to help their community out. By allowing friends and families to see the affected Ebola patient, by removing large tarps and secrecy of what was happening in isolation rooms, the community began to see the help they were receiving. Also, by having many of the caregivers attend funerals and rituals of the dead, they were seen as more caring and not as harsh as before. Anthropologist’s helped both the community, the patients, and the caregivers connect on a deeper level. They allowed each party to understand why stigmas and rituals needed to be preformed, from explaining to the community that the Ebola disease is spread by body fluid contact, so tarps and isolation to help not spread the disease was needed, as well as, having doctors understand that funerals were very important to the culture of the African community. This allowed disease to be controlled.

  6. Sarah Newman says:

    Hello!

    Great post! The theory derived from the surrounding African community regarding the “European” doctors trying to contain the Ebola outbreak was that of negativity. The members of the community did not see the doctors and care givers as healers, because almost everyone who went into their care died. By adding anthropologists, methods of telling the community about the disease, as well as, how it is spread helped de-stigmatize the theory that the white doctors were not bad people and were just trying to help their community out. By allowing friends and families to see the affected Ebola patient, by removing large tarps and secrecy of what was happening in isolation rooms, the community began to see the help they were receiving. Also, by having many of the caregivers attend funerals and rituals of the dead, they were seen as more caring and not as harsh as before. Anthropologist’s helped both the community, the patients, and the caregivers connect on a deeper level. They allowed each party to understand why stigmas and rituals needed to be preformed, from explaining to the community that the Ebola disease is spread by body fluid contact, so tarps and isolation to help not spread the disease was needed, as well as, having doctors understand that funerals were very important to the culture of the African community. This allowed disease to be controlled.

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