Blog 7- Human evolution continues

As scientists continue to study the ways in which humans have evolved since early hominins, much can still be learned about human evolution. One of the biggest contributors to human evolution is gene flow. Gene flow happens when populations are dispersed either through famine, starvation, wars, natural disasters such was floods, hurricanes, and so on and so forth. Thus, the process of natural selection also occurs as humans have to adapt to the new environment and this gene(s) are passed onto the offspring. For example, we learned that the neanderthals were fairly short individuals with a large nose or nostrils to protect them from the harsh weather.

Another relatively important example that contributes to human evolution is language. Scientists were able to discover that the FOXP2 gene. This gene is also found in human DNA and gives humans the ability to communicate through speech. Scientists suspect that because this gene was found in Neanderthals that they were able to communicate with humans.  I think this is important to bear in mind because it can encourage someone to step outside their comfort zone and to not let language be a barrier while traveling. According to a post titled, “The World’s Languages, in 7 Maps and Charts” published by the Washington Post, it is estimated that there are over seven thousand languages spoken globally. Of the seven continents, Asia ranks number one in having the most spoken languages while Europe has the least spoken languages. So, be like the neanderthals and don’t be afraid to speak a language/communicate with foreigners!

Lastly, what I find that was strikingly similar to humans and primates are mating selection and competition for resources. Male primates have been found to be in competition with one another over female primates and resources. This can be compared to how humans choose to date as well. Many men whom I’ve spoken to do not want a woman who does not have some form of higher education and same goes for men. There are even college grads and students who prefer someone in their same educational and economical background, thus limiting their dating pool. Like primates, humans also focus on physical traits/characteristics that are similar or dissimilar to them when choosing a mate. This is a large and widely accepted phenomenon. People date according to who they look like quite often, who has the same educational background, etc. What I also found strikingly familiar about female primates and women is that they usually favor men whom have formed friendships with them in the past. This is just one of the social strategies that humans and primates share in common.

In short, although humans are physically different than primates, we still share many of the same physical features with these primates but they have evolved due to the environment in which the gene flow occurs and natural selection. This adds to human diversity and the continuation of human evolution as we are steady moving around and dating from all over the world with different preferences. We have also been able to transcend language barriers and communicate with archaic homo sapiens like neanderthals. Lastly, we share many social and cultural patterns in our mating selection.

7 thoughts on “Blog 7- Human evolution continues

  1. Humans and primates are alike in many different aspects, but I enjoyed reading about how you compared their mate selection tendencies to how humans tend to limit down their own choices. I did not think about comparing us in such a way as mating selections. It is true that we look for mates by narrowing down our pool to select from by considering things such as education. Gene flow also plays a big role in human evolution, and I am glad you pointed out how this can effect traits such as how Neanderthals were short individuals with large noses to survive well in colder climates. I also agree that the FOXP2 gene was a really important mutation because the ability to speak and communicate is so vitally important nowadays especially.

  2. I totally agree with you that non-human primates and human share many physical and biological features. It is interesting that you talk about the similarities between primates and humans when choosing their partners. It is true that humans have the tendencies of limiting their pool base on education and background, but I am not sure whether all of the primates would choose their mates according to their body size or other factors. Gene flow plays an important role in evolution of human. In certain areas, some species had unique feature that other species did not have, for example, Neanderthals have large mid-face and noses because they lived in extremely cold and dry conditions. Also, FOXP2 gene is crucial in human evolution because this proves that Neanderthals did try to communicate with humans at that time.

  3. I totally agree with you that non-human primates and human share many physical and biological features. It is interesting that you talk about the similarities between primates and humans when choosing their partners. It is true that humans have the tendencies of limiting their pool base on education and background, but I am not sure whether all of the primates would choose their mates according to their body size or other factors. Gene flow plays an important role in evolution of human. In certain areas, some species had unique feature that other species did not have, for example, Neanderthals have large mid-face and noses because they lived in extremely cold and dry conditions. Also, FOXP2 gene is crucial in human evolution because this proves that Neanderthals did try to communicate with humans at that time.

  4. I totally agree with you that non-human primates and human share many physical and biological features. It is interesting that you talk about the similarities between primates and humans when choosing their partners. It is true that humans have the tendencies of limiting their pool base on education and background, but I am not sure whether all of the primates would choose their mates according to their body size or other factors. Gene flow plays an important role in evolution of human. In certain areas, some species had unique feature that other species did not have, for example, Neanderthals have large mid-face and noses because they lived in extremely cold and dry conditions. Also, FOXP2 gene is crucial in human evolution because this proves that Neanderthals did try to communicate with humans at that time.

  5. I totally agree with you that non-human primates and human share many physical and biological features. It is interesting that you talk about the similarities between primates and humans when choosing their partners. It is true that humans have the tendencies of limiting their pool base on education and background, but I am not sure whether all of the primates would choose their mates according to their body size or other factors. Gene flow plays an important role in evolution of human. In certain areas, some species had unique feature that other species did not have, for example, Neanderthals have large mid-face and noses because they lived in extremely cold and dry conditions. Also, FOXP2 gene is crucial in human evolution because this proves that Neanderthals did try to communicate with humans at that time.

  6. I totally agree with you that non-human primates and human share many physical and biological features. It is interesting that you talk about the similarities between primates and humans when choosing their partners. It is true that humans have the tendencies of limiting their pool base on education and background, but I am not sure whether all of the primates would choose their mates according to their body size or other factors. Gene flow plays an important role in evolution of human. In certain areas, some species had unique feature that other species did not have, for example, Neanderthals have large mid-face and noses because they lived in extremely cold and dry conditions. Also, FOXP2 gene is crucial in human evolution because this proves that Neanderthals did try to communicate with humans at that time.

  7. Hello, first off, I just wanted to say I thought you made a series of solid points throughout your post. I agree that it is very surprising how similar humans and primates mating habits can seem. Really, we are not that different than a majority of animals– following along with the ideals of sexual selection that was covered in class a couple of weeks ago. I agree that at least for myself, I very much limit my own dating pool on many factors that really should not be important. Because humans are so compex, I have to believe that it is more difficult for one of us to find a mate than a chimpanzee, but maybe that’s just a rationalization for being single.

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