Week 2 Activity Post

All around the world, there are several countries that treat women unfairly and put them through a lot. Brazil is one of the countries that does that as well. In this post, we are going to look into how women and girls are treated in Brazil. Life as a Brazilian women is not as beautiful as most would think it would be. Even though they say that men and women are equal, that is far from it. Women still do not get the respect that they deserve. The current president, Michel Temer, belittled women’s roles and said that their primary sole was to be household housewives and caretaker. He said that on International Women’s Day during his speech on March 8, 2017. He is also the first Brazilian president to have all male ministers, personal staff, and a presidential office. This is all after having a female predecessor as president, Dilma Rousseff. In the New York Times, Vanessa Barbara went into depth about this topic. She talked about the sexualized Carnival that Brazil throws every year, where they treat a women’s body as entertainment. They even have a website were they put out nude or seminude pictures of breasts belonging to the women that participated in the festival. Brazil has a high rate of women using plastic surgery, with 1.5 million operations happening yearly. In this article, I also read about a survey that took place in Brazil, were twenty-six percent of the people there said that women that are wearing revealing clothes “deserve” to be assaulted and another fifty-nine percent said that if women acted better (more modest), they would not be getting raped. There was another article that looked into what it means to be a Brazilian women. One of the things they researched was femicide in Latin America. Femicide is the act of killing a women or girl. This article found that twenty-five to fifty percent of women were prone to violence from their partner and that out of the eighty-three countries that were surveyed, Brazil came in as the fifth highest countries with their rates of femicide. The same article also talked about how more women were getting more education. They were even doing better compared to their male counterparts. About two-thirds of the people that graduated from universities are women. However, the rates of women being employed are still low and when they do get employment, they either receive work in poor districts or have a significantly lower wage than men. The legal age to get married is eighteen for women, however, with parental consent they could get married at the age of sixteen or even earlier if they get pregnant. In some countries, the consent for younger girls to get married is looked over to make sure it really is the best option for the women, but Brazil is not one of those countries. With all this information, you can tell that even though there have been some slightly better changes in the opportunities that women have received in Brazil, it is not were it should be. The current president is talking down on women when he should be helping to lift them up and give them better chances. This all just comes to show that Brazil is not equal for men and women and women do not get the fairness, equal opportunities, or respect that they deserve. If you are interested in reading more about this, I put down my three websites that you can look into more to learn more about Brazil and the women that live there.

Reference:

https://centreforfeministforeignpolicy.org/journal/2017/12/8/brazils-gender-trouble-sources-of-inequality-in-brazilian-institutions-and-political-representation

http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2017/03/08/ser-mujer-brasil

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