Ancient Egypt Satellite Imagery

After class I was talking to a friend about our Ancient Egypt Archaeology class and she mentioned an interesting discovery that I though I would share.  The link to an article about this discovery is: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-13522957.

Last year a United States Egyptologist, Dr. Sarah Parcak from the University of Alabama, used infrared satellite imaging to look at the region surrounding San El Hagar including Ancient Tanis. Infrared satellite imaging allows for denser soil to be visible. The ancient Egyptians used mud brick to build structures including their temples, houses and tombs. The mud brick is much denser than the surrounding soil, and allows for the structures to become visible.

Over 1,000 tombs and 3,000 ancient settlements including 17 pyramids were found! After the imaging was analyzed, they performed initial excavations and confirmed some of the findings. These excavation validated the use of this technology. Dr. Parcak explained “these are just the sites [close to] the surface. There are many thousands of additional sites that the Nile has covered over with silt. This is just the beginning of this kind of work.” The archaeological team used the satellite imagery to focus their archaeological field work. Another benefit from this technology is that the Egyptian Government can use the images to protect the countries antiquities!

What I found most interesting about this article was that they were able to tell from the imagery that if the tombs were looted. It is amazing that they can tell from a satellite image if a archaeological site is looted. What I would like to know is what details of the imagery allowed them to determine if looting occurred. I wonder if it has to do with the density of the soils. When looters loosen the soil to reach the artifacts, that could change the density of the soil; maybe this is what they are seeing in the infrared images.