Ashley Cerku

  • Doctoral Student
  • Research Assistant

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Research Interests

  • Visual Anthropology
  • Historical Photography
  • Identity
  • Digital Heritage
  • Ancestry
  • Ethnography
  • Cultural Landscapes
  • Geospatial Technologies

Biographical Info

Ashley is a first-year doctoral student and graduate research assistant studying sociocultural anthropology. She received their BA in English and Writing/Rhetoric from Oakland University in 2013, and her MA in Liberal Studies from Oakland University in 2017. For her master’s thesis, “Applied Visual Anthropology in the Progressive Era: The Influence of Lewis Hine’s Child Labor Photographic Series,” she looked at historical photographs and linked them to social justice issues and reformers during the progressive era in America. She has also been a Lecturer in Oakland University’s Anthropology department where she taught, “Culture and Society through Film.” In this course, students watched classical and modern adaptations of ethnographic films and discussed how they can be interpreted through an anthropological lens. For her PhD, she is interested in the visual anthropological approach to the digital construction of identity.

Publications

Cerku, A., Decker, D., & Stamps, R. (2019). The early history of oakland county. Oakland County Pioneer and Historical Society Bicentennial Booklet, 1.

Cerku, A. (2019). Applied visual anthropology in the progressive era: The influence of Lewis Hine’s child labor photographic series. Visual Anthropology, 32(3-4). https://doi.org/10.1080/08949468.2019.1637670

Cerku, A. (2017). Applied visual anthropology in the progressive era: The influence of Lewis Hine’s child labor photographic series. Oakland University, Rochester, MI.

Cerku, A. (2017). An artistic mural. In the Honors College and the City of Rochester, Michigan (Eds.), Imagining Rochester: Celebrating 200 years of Rochester, MI (pp. 15-16). Rochester, MI.: Honors College Critical and Creative Society.

Cerku, A. (2015). The art and rhetoric of letter writing: Preserving rhetorical strategies throughout time. Young Scholars in Writing, 12.