Lynne Goldstein

  • Professor of Anthropology
  • Director, Campus Archaeology Program
  • Adjunct Curator, MSU Museum

Contact

Twitter: @lynnegoldstein | @capmsu

Research Interests

  • Archaeology
  • Mortuary Analysis
  • Late Prehistoric Cultures of the Eastern Woodlands
  • Landscape Use and Change
  • Historic Archaeology
  • Public Archaeology

Biographical Info

LYNNE GOLDSTEIN is Professor of Anthropology at MSU, where she has been since 1996. She previously worked at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the majority of her research has focused on Wisconsin and the Great Lakes region.

Goldstein is currently Publications Director for the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association; her term ends in 2016. In 2000, Goldstein completed a four-year term as Editor of American Antiquity, the quarterly journal published by the Society for American Archaeology. She earned her BA in Anthropology from Beloit College in 1971, and her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Northwestern University in 1976. Goldstein has authored numerous publications on archaeological topics, and has served and continues to serve on various national advisory committees on behalf of archaeology.

Goldstein’s research is especially focused on the late prehistoric period in U.S. Great Lakes archaeology, on historic period cemeteries, and on the analysis of mortuary practices. In addition to research on the Wisconsin and Illinois, she has worked in California and Arizona on historic period cemeteries. She has worked at the Mississippian site of Aztalan, in southeastern Wisconsin for many years. In 2013, Goldstein returned to the Aztalan site with two colleagues where they collected data from two sets of excavations in order to allow better interpretation of the site structure.

Beginning in 2007, Goldstein created the Campus Archaeology Program – a research outreach and training program that focuses on the archaeology of MSU. The program is funded by the university and allows both graduate and undergraduate students to get real world experience in doing archaeology and interacting with various offices and people on and off campus.

Publications

Selected publications:

In press   “Differentiating Cremation from Incidental Burning: A View from the American Site of Aztalan,” in Cremation in European Archaeology (H. Williams, J. Cerezo-Roman, and A. Wickham, eds.). Cambridge University Press.

In press   Goldstein and Katy Meyers “Transformation and Metaphors: Thoughts on Cremation Practices in the Pre-Contact Eastern United States,” in Fire and the Body: The Meanings of Cremation (I Kuijt, G Cooney, and C Quinn, eds.) To be published by Amerind Foundation and University of Arizona Press. [Chapter 11] [publication anticipated 2014]

In press  Colin P. Quinn, Goldstein, Gabriel Cooney, and Ian Kuijt  “Complexities of Terminologies and Intellectual Frameworks in Cremation Studies,” in Fire and the Body: The Meanings of Cremation (I Kuijt, G Cooney, and C Quinn, eds.) To be published by Amerind Foundation and University of Arizona Press. [Chapter 2] [publication anticipated 2014]

In press  “The Politics of Archaeology: Repatriation,” in International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition (James Wright, ed.). Elsevier. [in production as of early 2014]

2014   “Repatriation: Overview,” in Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology (Claire Smith, ed.). Springer Science.

2013   Eric Kansa, Sarah Kansa, and Goldstein “On Ethics, Sustainability, and Open Access in Archaeology,” SAA Archaeological Record, 13(4):15-22.

2013  “Negotiating the Gateway: Working with Multiple Lines of Evidence to Determine Identity,” in The Dead Tell Tales: Essays in Honor of Jane E. Buikstra (M. C. Lozada and B O’Donnabhain, eds.). Cotsen Institute of Archaeology. University of California, Los Angeles; Monograph 76. Chapter 5; pp. 32-42.

2012  “The Cemetery at Fort Ross: What Does It Tell Us About Those Who Lived Here?” Proceedings of the Society for California Archaeology Vol. 26, pp. 234-242.

2012   Goldstein, Joseph T. Hefner, Kristin J. Sewell, and Michael Heilen “Cultural Affinity, Identity, and Relatedness: Distinguishing Individuals and Cultural Groups” (Chap. 3) in Uncovering Identity in Mortuary Analysis: Community-Sensitive Methods for Identifying Group Affiliation in Historical Cemeteries (M Heilen, ed.). Left Coast Press; pp. 91-103.

2012   Sewell, Kristin J., Michael Heilen, and Goldstein “Deathways and Tucson’s Living Population 1860-1880” (Chap. 5), in Uncovering Identity in Mortuary Analysis: Community-Sensitive Methods for Identifying Group Affiliation in Historical Cemeteries (M Heilen, ed.). Left Coast Press; pp. 165-183.

2012   Goldstein, Kristin J. Sewell, Michael Heilen, and Joseph T. Hefner “Mortuary Synthesis” (Chap. 6), in Uncovering Identity in Mortuary Analysis: Community-Sensitive Methods for Identifying Group Affiliation in Historical Cemeteries (M Heilen, ed.). Left Coast Press; pp. 185-226.

2012   “The Alameda-Stone Cemetery and Mortuary Archaeology” (Chap. 7), in Uncovering Identity in Mortuary Analysis: Community-Sensitive Methods for Identifying Group Affiliation in Historical Cemeteries (M Heilen, ed.). Left Coast Press; pp. 227-249.

2012   Goldstein and Roger Anyon “Cemeteries, Consultation, Repatriation, Reburial, and Sacred Spaces Today” (Chap. 8), in Uncovering Identity in Mortuary Analysis: Community-Sensitive Methods for Identifying Group Affiliation in Historical Cemeteries (M Heilen, ed.). Left Coast Press; pp. 251-263.

2010 “Aztalan Mortuary Practices Revisited,” Chapter 6 in Mississippian Mortuary Practices: Beyond Hierarchy and the Representationist Perspective (Lynne P. Sullivan and Robert Mainfort, eds.) University of Florida Press, Gainesville; pp. 90-112.

2009 “Aztalan,” in Archaeology in America: An Encyclopedia. Volume 2: Midwest and Great Plains/Rocky Mountains (Frank McManaman, ed.). Greenwood Publishing; pp. 136-139.

2009 “Effigy Mounds,” in Archaeology in America: An Encyclopedia. Volume 2: Midwest and Great Plains/Rocky Mountains (Frank McManaman, ed.). Greenwood Publishing; pp. 121-126.

2008 Goldstein and Robert A. Brinkmann “The Context of the Cemetery at Fort Ross: Multiple Lines of Evidence, Multiple Research Questions,” Pacific Coast Archaeological Society Quarterly 39:4:1-21.

2008 “Who Owns the Past?,” Encyclopedia of Archaeology (Deborah Pearsall, ed.) Vol. 3, pp. 2212-2214. Academic Press (Elsevier), New York.

2006 “Mortuary Analysis and Bioarchaeology,” in Bioarchaeology: A Contextual Approach, Lane A. Beck and Jane E. Buikstra, eds. Chapter 14. Elsivier Publishing.

2005 Birmingham, Robert A. and Lynne Goldstein Aztalan: Mysteries of an Ancient Indian Town. University of Wisconsin Press and Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison.

2004 “An Analysis of Plummets in the Lower Illinois River Valley,” in Aboriginal Ritual and Economy in the Eastern Woodlands: Essays in Memory of Howard Dalton Winters (Anne-Marie Cantwell, Lawrence Conrad, and Jonathan E. Reyman, editors). Illinois State Museum Scientific Papers, Vol. XXX, Springfield. Kampsville Studies in Archeology and History, Volume 5; pp. 73-112.

2002 Goldstein and Donald H. Gaff “Recasting the Past: Examining Assumptions About Aztalan, In Current Issues in the Archaeology of the Western Great Lakes: Problems and Progress, edited by R, Jeske. The Wisconsin Archeologist 83(2):98-110, Milwaukee.

2002 “Afterword – Visible Death: Mortuary Site and Mortuary Landscape in Diachronic Perspective,” The Space and Place of Death (Helaine Silverman and David B. Small, editors). Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association, No. 11; pp. 201-206.

2000 “Mississippian Ritual as Viewed through the Practice of Secondary Disposal of the Dead,” in Mounds, Modoc, and Mesoamerica: Papers in Honor of Melvin L. Fowler (Steven R. Ahler, editor). Illinois State Museum Scientific Papers, Volume XXVIII; pp. 193-205. Springfield.

1995 “Politics, Law, Pragmatics, and Human Burial Excavations: An Example from Northern California,” in Bodies of Evidence: Reconstructing History Through Skeletal Analysis (Anne L. Grauer, editor). John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York; pp. 3-17.

1995 “Landscapes and mortuary practices: A case for regional perspectives,” in Regional Approaches to Mortuary Analysis (Lane Anderson Beck, editor). Plenum Press, New York; pp. 101-121.